Bow To Your New God, Blockchain. Bow Down. 3 2356

It’s pronounced ‘Zero Ex Omega’.

It’s the brainchild of two people who apparently have lots of time on their hands and a penchant for publicity stunts: artist Avery Singer, child of Ramona Singer, who seems to be someone on television, and Bay Area whiz kid slash former CEO of Augur Matt Liston.

Together at a conference at New York City’s New Museum, Singer and Liston unveiled 0xΩ. It’s a blockchain religion they invented.

Do we need a blockchain religion? Of course we do. Look at it this way: blockchain has always been a religion. Singer and Liston are just making it official—and, of course, decentralizing it.

Not a Critique of Capitalism, But…

“In our secular culture, we have sort of replaced religion with capitalism or, rather, this rampant consumerism,” Liston told Wired. “0xΩ isn’t a direct critique of that, but I think it’s definitely a clear point to make.”

Put that way, 0xΩ isn’t so different from the Church of the SubGenius, which satirizes everything on Earth to rough sketch a core dogma of meaninglessness and mayhem transcendable only by the attainment of ‘slack’. Or more recently, it resembles trends in chaos magick, which asserts that “nothing is true and everything is permissible.”

These anarchic belief systems (or anti-belief systems?) can be seen as responses to some of late capitalism’s gaping failures, namely the frenzied fervors of consumerism, epidemic feelings of void and alienation resulting from an absence of cultural roots, and the general collapse of institutional religion as a place to find any meaning or value.

From this climate emerges the great and terrible Dogewhal.

Yes, Dogewhal.

“We have this avatar I’ve created who is a narwhal with a doge head, a beret, tattoos, an infinity tail, an ethereum logo,” said Singer at the unveiling, while muffling laughter.

Is this a joke? Yes! Is there more to it than that? Also yes!

The rest of the crypto world takes itself so seriously, it can stand a little shake up from time to time. If nothing else, 0xΩ brings that relief. While ostensibly the meaningless antics of the clever, it could actually have some new ideas about how we approach belief systems, and some new applications of the block.

The Block X Religion

0xΩ is a custom religion, but it’s also a platform for existing religions. On 0xΩ, everyone in the religion has an equal say in which beliefs prevail, and what will be the content of sacred texts.

It’s a takedown of traditional hierarchies in which acolytes apply themselves to the instruction of a master who holds the keys to the kingdom, hierarchies which people are less and less interested in.

“We’re incentivizing mindsharing, and eventually mind upload to use consensus to form a structure of collective consciousness,” Liston said. This deliberate manufacturing of consensus reality, if it works, would make Peter J. Carroll proud.

Where Did This All Come From?

The name ‘0xΩ’ itself has gnostic overtones. The void, or the original nothingness, multiplied by the sum total of all material existence, signified by the character Ω. Nothing times everything. Whence comes the universe? From what void does it all spring? You could ask the same of Bitcoin, which spontaneously emerges from nothingness just as the universe did, or does, maybe.

Liston, who also previously worked with a decentralized prediction company called, ironically, Gnosis, says he “grew up Jewish.”

He was pushed out of his position as CEO of Augur in a series of legal battles surrounding one of the world’s first ICOs. Augur, a betting tool that rewards users for correct predictions on elections, markets, or even the weather, seems an apt place to start for someone whose business aspirations seem to revolve around the ethereal nature of belief.

Regarding his approach to blockchain, Liston says “I’m obsessed and very driven by what these technologies can do, but I’m bored with it being a space that’s dominated by engineers and finance people.”

Like What Does Religion Even Mean, Dude?

It raises questions like: Is a democratized religion even a religion? Do the people know best on matters concerning the secret laws of nature? What is the point of all this? The best answer to the latter is probably ‘well, what is the point of anything?’

Sure, 0xΩ may be dismissive of the cultural post that world religions occupy. It’s a bit like someone mouthing a bunch of gibberish and declaring they’ve just founded a language. But it disrupts the evangelical fervor of blockchain enthusiasts, and that, if nothing else, is a service to humanity.

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I grew up in the Silicon valley under the technological mentorship of Steve Wozniak. I'm a proud member of the Choctaw Nation, I've lived, worked and traveled all over the world, and I now write in the Pacific Northwest.

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Serial Entrepreneur Lisa Carmen Wang Launches the Bad Bitch Empire Comments Off on Serial Entrepreneur Lisa Carmen Wang Launches the Bad Bitch Empire 694

While cryptocurrency has a notorious reputation for investment volatility, its adoption has marked one of the most significant shifts in wealth of our generation.  Last year, CBS reported that as many as 100,000 people may have amassed millions in bitcoin with many profiting from early adoption of the high profile cryptocurrency. When you zoom into where the wealth is distributed, though, the data is alarming. 

Recently, Entrepreneur published a list of The 50 Richest People in Crypto. On the list are individuals that made fortunes as shrewd investors and early technology adopters, but there’s one person that stands out. From this list of men from various parts of the world, Blythe Masters is the only woman listed reflecting a broader problem: women are consistently underrepresented in new technology sectors and the blockchain is no exception.

A survey by Pew Research found that more than 40% of men have invested or traded cryptocurrency, compared with only 19% of women. Moreover, half of women in STEM occupations have experienced workplace discrimination, further marginalizing the group from participation in emerging technologies. Fortunately, there are women actively changing the status quo.

As the founder of SheWorx, which was acquired by Republic in 2019, Lisa Carmen Wang made a career amassing resources for female founders and working to change the number of women represented in tech leadership. Now, she’s set her sights on leveling the playing field for women through financial literacy. 

“It wasn’t until I began investing myself that I really began to understand how to grow wealth,” says Wang. “Financial and investment literacy is essential to giving women a seat at the table, particularly when a sector is emerging and rapidly growing. Crypto is having one of those moments, and women need to capitalize on the opportunity in order to create systemic and meaningful change.”

Wang’s Bad Bitch Empire will be a community with a suite of educational and investment products beginning with a podcast about women breaking barriers and building wealth in Web3. According to the website, the “Bad Bitch Empire is the private crypto investment club for ambitious women who want to make our money work for us.”

High profile members include Lindsey Berg, Shannon Snow, Elizabeth Tan, Chi Achebe, Yael Streit, Katia Zaitsev, and Shaun Sager, to name a few. 

The BAD BITCH EMPIRE was unveiled at this year’s  Bitcoin 2022, the largest conference focused on Bitcoin alongside the podcast’s inaugural episodes. For more information or to request to join visit www.thebadbitchempire.com.

Foxies NFT Series Launches to Bring Blockchain Education to Women Comments Off on Foxies NFT Series Launches to Bring Blockchain Education to Women 449

Founded by serial tech entrepreneur and blockchain consultant Adryenn Ashley, Foxies.art launched last month with a lofty goal: to educate one million women and girls on blockchain technology. 

It’s an important mission – women need to be involved in new technologies to bridge the gender wealth gap. According to NextAdvisor, compared to men, around half as many women are investing in crypto and even fewer — a meager 4-6% — are occupying jobs in the space. 

“The early days of an industry are often when the fortunes are made — and those big winners typically influence the direction the industry goes in the future, from whom to invest in to what to build next,” says NextAdvisor writer Alex Gailey. “So now is the time for women to make their mark on the crypto industry and its future, and their absence now could diminish their influence — and benefits — in the long run, experts say.” 

The project, which features original artworks by Amanda Beaton ,resembles a new-age Pokemon game. For .1 ETH each, people can purchase and collect Foxies with different levels of rarity. Down the road, Ashley plans to launch a Foxies “breeding” program for holders of two or more Foxies to mint new original NFTs. Each newly bred Foxie will kick off a scholarship for a deserving recipient. 

“Showing women that they can bring their passions to new technologies and create space and wealth for themselves in emerging areas has been the journey of my career,” says Ashley. “NFTs are a digestible entry-point into the blockchain and I’m excited to see the impact that we can have with this program.”

Foxies.art is fiscally sponsored by Ashley’s non-profit, the Digital Legacy Foundation.

To participate, visit Foxies.art.

(Disclosure: as the founder of The Block Talk, making the technology sector accessible for women and other marginalized groups is one of my goals. While I do not benefit financially from foxies.art, I have agreed to offer pro bono communications consulting and media partnership to help them realize their vision.)

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